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Early Orthodontic Treatment & Common Orthodontic Problems

Metairie Office
5036 Yale Street
Suite 301
Metairie, LA 70006 
Phone (504)-456-7874



Covington Office
61 Park Place Drive
Suite B
Covington, LA 70433 
Phone (985)-867-3636

Orthodontic Treatment for Children


Orthodontic Treatment for Kids, Metairie and Covington

Many children have orthodontic problems which develop at a young age. Parents therefore want to know how early their children's orthodontic problems need to be treated. Although most orthodontic problems are best treated with traditional braces, some problems need to be treated as soon as they are noticed, no matter how young a child is. Early age treatment ensures the greatest result and the least amount of time and expense. The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that the initial orthodontic evaluation should occur at the first sign of child orthodontic problems or no later than age 7.

Early orthodontic treatment is effective and desirable in certain situations. Some of the problems which do require early orthodontic treatment include:

  • A crossbite of the back teeth (posterior crossbite).
  • A crossbite of the adult front teeth (anterior crossbite, permanent dentition).
  • An extremely narrow upper dental arch (severe bilateral maxillary constriction).
  • Inadequate growth and development of the midface (midface hypoplasia).
  • Severe crowding which prevents the normal eruption of adult teeth.
  • Tipping of teeth which prevents the normal eruption of adult teeth.
  • A six-year molar which cannot erupt because it is caught underneath a baby tooth (ectopic eruption of the first permanent molar).
  • Adult front teeth which are protruding excessively, and are therefore in danger of being hit or traumatized (extremely flared maxillary incisors).
  • An adult tooth which is erupting in the wrong direction (ectopic canine eruption).
  • A front tooth having a much receded gum line due to its unfavorable position in the arch (extreme gingival recession secondary to protrusion).
  • A child with a cleft palate who is about to have a bone graft done (presurgical orthopedic expansion).

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